News Releases

Murray: “I am hopeful that more and more Republicans will listen to their constituents and agree to take the first step of meeting with Judge Garland” 

Murray’s meeting is on 60th day of Court vacancy; Republicans continue to refuse to do their jobs and consider Garland 

(Washington, D.C.) Today, Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) met with the President’s nominee to the Supreme Court, Chief Judge Merrick Garland, in her Senate office. Following the meeting, Senator Murray released the following statement:

“After meeting with Judge Garland and having the chance to talk through his background, experiences, and judicial philosophy in person--it is clearer than ever to me that he is a strong nominee who is absolutely qualified to serve on the Supreme Court. I am hopeful that more and more Republicans will listen to their constituents and agree to take the first step of meeting with Judge Garland as well. And then they should continue to do their job and give him true consideration, a fair hearing, and a vote.

In my meeting with Judge Garland, we discussed a range of issues that impact families across Washington state. I was especially interested in his thinking about the right to privacy and how it relates to women's reproductive rights. We also discussed campaign finance reform, his experience evaluating cases about the right of workers to organize and make their voices heard, and other issues people in Washington state are focused on.

Although I will continue reviewing his background and I am hopeful that Republicans will allow us to learn more from a hearing in the Judiciary Committee, I am very encouraged by what I heard in our meeting. Judge Garland should receive the fair consideration the American people expect.”

Murray’s statement on Garland’s nomination is here. Senator Murray has been calling on Senate Republican leaders to do their job and work with the President and Senate Democrats to fill the vacancy in the Supreme Court. Very shortly after Chief Justice Antonin Scalia passed away, Senate Republicans announced that the Senate Judiciary Committee would not hold a hearing on, or meet with a Supreme Court nominee. Since the Senate Judiciary Committee started holding hearings on Supreme Court nominees a century ago, no pending Supreme Court nominee has ever been denied a hearing. In the past three decades it has taken the Senate an average of about two months to consider Supreme Court nominees from nomination to confirmation.

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