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“I am going to keep fighting for my middle class tax bills that would reward families for their hard work, deliver them some much-needed help to pay their bills, and help the economy grow from the middle out, not the top down”

(Washington, D.C.)—Today, U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) released the following statement on tax day to highlight her commitment to fighting for a tax code that works for the middle class and working families. Murray recently introduced two middle class tax cut bills that would put more money in the pockets of middle class families and help them afford child care.

“As workers across the country finish filing their taxes, many of them are reminded that our tax code simply hasn’t kept up with the realities of the 21st century middle class,” said Senator Patty Murray. “Instead of more tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans and biggest corporations that need them the least, we should be cutting taxes for the middle class and working families that need it the most and will actually use the extra money in their pockets to boost the economy. So I am going to keep fighting for my middle class tax bills that would reward families for their hard work, deliver them some much-needed help to pay their bills, and help the economy grow from the middle out, not the top down. And I am hopeful that Democrats and Republicans can work together to get these common-sense changes to the tax code made before next tax season.”

Read more about Senator Murray’s middle class tax cut bills:

21st Century Worker Tax Cut Act

The 21st Century Worker Tax Cut introduces a new tax credit for parents who both work. The credit will help reduce the large, sometimes insurmountable, additional costs that come when both parents are working, such as child care, transportation, and a higher marginal tax rate. To qualify, couples must file jointly, have at least one child under age 12, and both have earnings. The credit is calculated as 10 percent of the first $10,000 of the second earner’s income. The maximum credit is worth $1000 and begins to phase out starting at $110,000 of income. 

Helping Working Families Afford Child Care Act

Child care costs have risen dramatically in the past several decades, and the main tax credit intended to help defray these costs has not kept up with the changing times. The Helping Working Families Afford Child Care Act will reform the Child and Dependent Care Tax credit so that it delivers a larger benefit to more families. Under the legislation, the allowable expense limit will be raised to $8,000—much closer to the average cost of childcare today, the credit rate will be flattened at 35 percent for most middle-income families, and the credit will be made refundable, so low-income families can benefit as well. Today, most families get only a $600 credit, but with these reforms, the credit will be $2,800 for most low and middle-income families.