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Senator Murray: “Communities of color, Tribal communities, and rural families have been left out of infrastructure conversations for far too long, and I’m glad I was able to work with the Biden Administration to get this funding out to communities in our state” 

(Washington, D.C.) – Today, U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, announced more than $4 million in federal grants and loans from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to upgrade rural water and wastewater infrastructure in Washington state. Scatchet Head Water District, Hunters Water District, and the town of Naches received federal funds for rural investment projects that will significantly improve the water systems for Washington state families. The awards come via the USDA Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant Program to help eliminate outdated pipes and service lines to safeguard public health and safety in rural communities. The Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant Program provides funding for clean and reliable drinking water systems, sanitary sewage disposal, sanitary solid waste disposal, and storm water drainage. The program serves households and businesses in eligible rural areas with populations of 10,000 or less.

“Communities of color, Tribal communities, and rural families have been left out of infrastructure conversations for far too long, and I’m glad I was able to work with the Biden Administration to get this funding out to communities in our state,” said Senator Murray. “Sanitary water systems should be accessible for every family and community in Washington state and across the country, and I’m going to keep working to make that a reality. Ensuring access to clean water for our families will be a priority for me in any upcoming infrastructure legislation.”

The Scatchet Head Water District will receive a $2.5 million loan to upgrade the water system in Clinton by replacing water mains, submersible well pumps, emergency storage tank, pressure tank and media to improve the efficiency of the iron and manganese filtration system. This water system was first constructed in 1958. Replacing the aging water mains will help to correct any water loss.

The Hunters Water District will receive a $152,000 grant and an $18,000 loan to replace a water reservoir and approximately 1,500 linear feet of six-inch diameter water main. The project replaces old asbestos water mains installed in the late 1940s, addressing chronic pressure issues and controls. The project will reduce system leakage, increase pressure, and support a more efficient and reliable drinking water system for the community. Hunters is an unincorporated community established in 1884 in rural Stevens County.

The town of Naches will receive a $1.99 million grant and a $2.36 million loan to eliminate identified deficiencies and implement recommended improvements by the State Regulatory Agency for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting of the their wastewater treatment plant. These improvements will provide more efficient operations, reduce maintenance costs and enhance effluent quality, benefiting the 795 residents of Naches.

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