Patty in the News

Financial literacy is a sound investment

Washington Sen. Patty Murray chose Foster High School in Tukwila to announce her new legislation to promote financial literacy. Faculty and students are leading the way with programs to make the next generation better savers, investors and consumers.

Apr 10 2009

Murray's Financial and Economic Literacy Improvement Act of 2009 is an ambitious effort to teach the next generation — and their elders — how to better manage their finances. The legislation seeks to promote age-appropriate courses and activities for two levels of students: K-12 and in two- and four-year colleges. States would apply for grants totaling $250 million a year for five years.

- The Seattle Times
“This funding will help support local jobs and Auburn’s long-term goal of downtown revitalization,” Sen. Murray said in a press release. “In the face of a deepening recession, keeping vital local projects like this moving forward is critically important. I'm proud to work to return Auburn residents’ taxpayer dollars to projects in their own backyard."

- The Auburn Reporter
Drug arrests are a daily routine for Yakima police. Whether it's marijuana, cocaine, or methamphetamine none of these drugs are new. Shawnee Cady says she has seen it out in the open. "In the night time, I usually see a bunch of cars sitting and somebody in the corner waiting for the person, and they'll be like cha!" Cady explained the drug deals through hand gestures.

Senator Patty Murray included Yakima in a bill to fight Methamphetamine. Yakima is one of several cities that would share 2.1 million dollars.

- KIMATV.com
Senate Bill Could Give Millions of Dollars to Tri-City Projects

A new Senate bill could mean millions of dollars for transportation and health care projects in the Tri-Cities.

Senator Patty Murray is the front-runner of this bill and says it will create more jobs. The Senate bill would provide more than two million dollars to extend Steptoe South to 10th Ave.

- KNDO.com
When sailors are not deployed, they should be able to spend as much time at home as possible, she said.

"I know they do not need the added stress of being separated from their families during training," she said. "I believe that strong families are good for our military, and they are critical to military communities like Everett."

- Everett Herald