Senator Patty Murray press release
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Senators Murray and Cantwell Announce More than $605 Million Investment to Help Repair Washington State Bridges

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is the largest ever federal investment in bridge repair

More than 6,000 bridges in Washington state are currently in need of repair

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, U.S. Senators Patty Murray (D-WA), a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, and Maria Cantwell (D-WA), Chair of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, announced $605 million in funding for bridge repair in Washington State over five years from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which Senator Murray and Senator Cantwell helped craft.

“Anyone who drives in Washington state knows how badly we’ve needed upgraded, more reliable bridges,” said Senator Murray. “And now—thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law we worked to pass—our state will see more than $600 million to repair and rebuild those bridges. That will mean less traffic and shorter, safer commutes for so many people across our state—all while creating jobs in every community. That is a huge deal for everyone in our state who uses our roads and bridges every day—and it’s just the beginning of how the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law will improve our daily lives and bolster our state’s economy.

“In Washington state, we know how vital bridges are to connecting communities and improving freight mobility, and we know how important it is they are properly maintained in order to keep people and goods moving. With over 400 of Washington‘s bridges classified as structurally deficient, I’m glad to see this $605 million in much-needed funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law going to Washington so we can improve our bridge infrastructure,” said Senator Cantwell.

The funding comes via the U.S. Department of Transportation’s new Bridge Replacement, Rehabilitation, Preservation, Protection, and Construction Program (Bridge Formula Program).

Of the 8,338 bridges in Washington state, 416 are classified as structurally deficient, and over 6,000 are in need of repair. The funding will be provided to the Washington state government in a lump sum split between the state and localities to be used on bridge repair projects decided by the state and local governments. While funding will be allocated to specific projects, currently, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has identified two bridges (the Ship Canal Bridge in King County and the Vantage Bridge in Kittitas County) as priority preservation projects with critical funding needed, and the following bridges as having unfunded preservation needs:

  • SR 503 Lew River Yale Bridge (Clark County)
  • Cowlitz River Bridge on SR 4 (Cowlitz County)
  • Port Washington Bridge on SR 303 (Kitsap County)
  • Skagit River Bridge on SR 536 (Skagit County)
  • 10 bridges on SR 542 in Whatcom County need preservation work east of Deming.
  • Palouse River Bridge on US 195 in Colfax (Whitman County)
  • Wenatchee River Bridge on SR 207 (Chelan County)
  • US 97 Columbia River Beebe Bridge (Douglas County)
  • Kettle River Bridge on SR 21 (Ferry County)
  • Dry Wash Bridge in Khalotus on SR 260 (Franklin County)
  • Elmer C. Huntley Bridge on SR 127 (Garfield County)
  • Humptulips River Bridge on US 101 (Grays Harbor County)
  • Swale Creek Bridge and Bickleton Road Bridge on SR 97(Klickitat County)
  • Chehalis Riverside Bridge on SR 6 (Lewis County)
  • 8 bridges over the Methow River on SR 153 (Okanogan County)
  • The Teal Slough Bridge and Greenhead Slough Bridge on US 101 (Pacific County)
  • Spiketon Creek Bridge on SR 162 (Pierce County)
  • Brickford Avenue Bridge over SR 9 (Snohomish County)
  • Deschutes River Bridge on SR 507 (Thurston County)
  • Harrison Road Bridge on SR 823 near Selah (Yakima County)

 

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